Archives for posts with tag: Christmas

Live Show at Third and Lindsley and Christmas Interview

Mike Farris and son, Christian first public performance together, Third and Lindsley, Dec. 21,2013, Nashville, TN, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris and son, Christian first public performance together, Third and Lindsley, Dec. 21,2013, Nashville, TN, photo – Brad Hardisty

“It was very special that my son Christian wanted to do “Let It be Me” by The Everly Brothers and doing it as a duet. It turned out to be the most memorable part of the show for everybody.” – Mike Farris

Miike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Miike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris and The Fairfield Four brought Nashville the Spirit of Christmas last Saturday night at Third and Lindsley to a sold –out crowd pulling out all the stops with special guests and great arrangements of standards and a few surprise guests at the end of the night.

The Fairfield Four, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

The Fairfield Four, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

The Grammy Award winning group that has a heritage going way back to 1921 beginning at The Fairfield Baptist Church, The Fairfield Four started out the experience with a strong accapella set of Gospel standards. The group was featured in the movie “Oh Brother, Where Art Thou” as well as the John Fogerty album Blue Moon Swamp on “A Hundred and Ten In The Shade.”

Robert Hamlett, The Fairfield Four, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, photo - Brad Hardisty

Robert Hamlett, The Fairfield Four, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, photo – Brad Hardisty

As The Fairfield Four finished up their set, everybody backstage had their eyes glued to the television monitor as the weather front was coming through downtown Nashville just as Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue were getting ready to take the stage. Nashville had a warm front come through the last couple of days and the weather was getting ready to drastically change with possible tornadic conditions on everybody’s mind.

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

After reviewing the weather conditions, the decision was made to hold off about thirty minutes to let the storm pass and see if there were any possible power interruptions.  After an all clear, Mike Farris and Company hit the stage with “What Christmas Means To Me.”

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm  Revue, Third and Lindsley, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue, Third and Lindsley, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

This was the first time Mike Farris had put on a full Christmas Show and he seemed to have as much fun as the packed house. The arrangements were Jazzy, Bluesy and downright soulful.  The night proved to be a down home, all about Nashville Gospel and Christmas in the snow with a full roster of  Music City guests.

Mike featured Samson White and Hayley Reed on “White Christmas” which is one of the songs that Mike has done before and had the opportunity to develop even further this go around.

Angela Primm, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Angela Primm, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

John Primm, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

John Primm, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

There were special guests like well known Gospel Singer, Angela Primm who has sang with Andre Crouch, Patti Austin, Bill Gaither and Gretchen Wilson who was joined onstage by her husband John Primm that got everybody going with his Louis Armstrong impression on “Wonderful World.”

Mike had a first singing with his son, Christian on The Everly Brothers, “Let It Be Me” that amazed the crowd. Christian has a strong voice that will no doubt show off his own style and approach as time goes on.

Mike E as Prince, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike E as Prince, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

Things got hilarious when Mike E did a strong Prince all in purple who had showed up at the wrong venue on accident and decided to own the place with a strong version of “Purple Rain” right before Morris Day [Samson White] got everybody on their feet to do “The Bird.”

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythm Revue finished off a jubilant night with “Santa Claus Is Comin’ To Town” complete with Santa throwing candy at everybody before bringing in the spirit of the real reason for the season with “O’ Holy Night,” as a spirit of joy permeated the whole scene.

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

It was one of those moments that should have been captured on DVD so that it could be shared with everybody else. As far as local shows go, this was the Christmas show to be at this year. After a couple of days of reflection, Mike Farris talked with The Nashville Bridge.

Brad Hardisty / The Nashville Bridge: That was really wild when the storm front passed right through Nashville after the Fairfield Four performed and right before you were going to go on.

Gale Stuart, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Gale Stuart, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris: Yeah, we were watching it on the big screen in the back and trying to decide what to do.  There wasn’t any tornado activity and it looked like it was just straight line winds. We were trying to decide if we needed to get people out of the balconies but then it looked like we just needed to wait for the line to blow through before we started our set and make sure the power was going to stay on. It worked out okay. When I got home, I had tree limbs down and stuff was blown around in the yard.

TNB: How long ago did you start working on this Christmas show?

Steve Roper, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Steve Roper, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: We did a show with a couple of Christmas songs including an arrangement of “White Christmas” a few years ago and have been thinking about doing a full Christmas show ever since. We really decided that this year we were going to do a full show. I have a great band and they are able to see my vision and that is really a great thing to have. They are able to catch on to the arrangements and see where I want to go with that. They also came up with a lot of great ideas for the show.

Samson White as Morris Day, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Samson White as Morris Day, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

TNB: What about the comedy bits, Prince and Morris Day?

MF: Angie [Angela Primm] does a show called Still Waters, Christian Light Club. It’s kind of like the Cotton Club where she has people playing different characters and she does a swing set with Cab Calloway and others. After that, she does a set with tributes to Prince, Morris Day.  I got to be a part of that.Angie asked me if I wanted to have Mike E do Prince and we came up with the idea that he showed up at the wrong venue and it kind of went from there.

TNB: Did the show exceed your expectations? It did mine.

Oscar Utterstrom, Chris West, Jon-Paul Frappier, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Oscar Utterstrom, Chris West, Jon-Paul Frappier, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: It sure did. We have already started planning on next year and it is going to be even better.

Paul Brown, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Paul Brown, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

TNB: You have great support here in Nashville and that filled that Christmas season void of the Blues/Gospel/R&B Community, especially with guest performers.

Derrek Phillips, Third and Lindsley, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Derrek Phillips, Third and Lindsley, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: I really appreciate that. I am hoping to do more than one show next year.

TNB: Was that first time you have performed with your son Christian onstage?

Christian Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Christian Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: It was and it was very special that my son Christian wanted to do that particular song, “Let It Be Me” by The Everly Brothers and doing the duet. It turned out to be the most memorable part of the show for everybody.

TNB: I hope you got a board mix of the show?

MF: I didn’t think about doing that, but that is something we will think about for the future. I’d really like to do a Christmas album.

TNB: Are you all ready for Christmas?

Gale Stuart, Samson White, Angela Primm, Hayley Reed, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Gale Stuart, Samson White, Angela Primm, Hayley Reed, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: I had such a hard time with Christmas when I was a kid, but now I have my family around me and we actually listen to Christmas songs all year. It’s our favorite time. You now it’s all about Christ the Savior and that is important to me.

TNB: The band just sounded so great.

Michael Rhodes, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Michael Rhodes, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: All the money went to benefit the musicians in my band. Whenever there is a benefit they always call musicians to come and play and they always do, but nobody ever stops to think that maybe the musicians could really use the help. I do a couple of benefits a year with my band and who knows how many they do besides working with me because they work with other people too.  That is the way that I want to do this in the future. I want this to be for my band.

TNB: It sounds like you really enjoy this time of year.

Gale Stuart, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Gale Stuart, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: This is a special time of year, my wife and I celebrate our Anniversary on New Years as well. It’s a big time of year for us.

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

TNB: I guess the new album should be coming out in 2014?

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythym Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythym Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

MF: Yeah, it will be out before the summer tour. Merry Christmas everybody!

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythym Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo - Brad Hardisty

Mike Farris and The Roseland Rhythym Revue, Third and Lindsley, Nashville, TN, 12/21/2013, photo – Brad Hardisty

–          Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridgeathotmaildotcom

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sammy kershaw christmas cdThe Nashville Bridge caught up with Sammy Kershaw just as he was getting ready to do some Holiday gigs up north on the Roots & Boots Tour with Aaron Tippin and Joe Diffie.  Sammy has just released a new Christmas collection, A Sammy Klaus Christmas in time to celebrate the season. The Roots & Boots Tour has been celebrating real country music all year long.

Brad Hardisty / The Nashville Bridge: It looks like you are heading up to some cold country.

Sammy Kershaw: I hit North Dakota first and then South Dakota second and come on back, then I’m back in Louisiana.

TNB: Okay, is the South Dakota show just your band or is it Roots & Boots?

SK: No, this is Roots & Boots this weekend.

TNB: Where are you at this morning?

SK: I’m here in Nashville; got in last night, just gettin’ on the bus.

TNB: Are you living here in Nashville now?

SK: No, I live in Lafayette, Louisiana, but, the band and the bus are here in Nashville. I fly into meet them every week.

TNB: I was listenin’ to A Sammy Klaus Christmas, but, let’s talk about the Roots & Boots tour that has turned into a long time successful thing.

sammy kershaw roots and boots 01SK: Yeah man, It is really starting to catch on now. We started at the Isle of Capri Casino on December 17th, 2011 in Lula, Mississippi and it’s just started to kick in now. Of course Joe, Aaron and I recorded some music and we are sending a single to radio the first part of the year and I’m hoping this thing goes through 2014.

TNB: I read back in June that you were going to record going forward.  So, you have a single coming out. That’s fantastic.

SK: Yes. So we’re going to try to get the video shot in the month of December before we get to busy into the Christmas holidays. We will have the video out the middle of January and of course the single following that.

TNB: Is it too early to announce a song title?

SK: Well, yeah maybe just a little bit.

TNB: Okay, we will hold on that but get people excited. Are you working with Butch Carr?

SK: Oh, yeah man. I love Butch. Butch is doing the mixing for me.

TNB: Great!  Are you producing the single?

SK: Yes.

TNB: Looking at the tour, it’s kind of like the country “Rat Pack” it’s growing in popularity.

SK: I tell you what I think. People are really liking it; because, I think a lot of people are missing country music nowadays. I’m not being ugly when I say that. I’m just being honest. I think a lot of people are missing country music and then you have three guys, you got me and Diffie and Aaron Tippin we are all on the stage at the same time and it’s an unplugged show. I think between us you have 85 hit records so we get to each pick six or seven of the biggest hits that we’ve had in our career to do. Aaron sings one then Joe sings one then I’ll sing one then it goes back to Aaron. We do that all night long. What started out to be, was supposed to be a 75-80 minute show is now turned into a two to two and a half hour show. We get to tell stories behind the songs. We pick on each other all night so the chemistry is really good. The folks are really liking the stripped down music. Like I said, I think they are really missing country music. We are having big crowds at these shows man. I’m talking about young folk too, the younger folks in their early twenties, and singing every song.

TNB: I agree with that situation with Country Music. You have what you would call traditional or classic country artists out of Texas and stuff like that, but, then you  got a big influence, people call it the “Fleetwood Mac” influence or “AC/DC” or whatever but it’s kind of changing what you are hearing on the radio. How do you feel about that? Do you think classic or traditional country will come back?

sammy kershaw 01SK: I think so. I have been saying it for a long time and it hasn’t happened yet, but, I’m kind of starting to think that it is fixin’ to happen soon. You know, I used to blame radio, but, I can’t blame radio, radio only plays what the record label will send ‘em. You know, look, I have said this for a long time; Country Music is the only genre that hates itself. It wants to be everything else but Country music.  I don’t understand that. I just don’t get it. We only have a handful of artists anymore that sell platinum albums. They are selling platinum singles or gold singles… selling 500,000 singles or a million single downloads, but, you know what? There’s only a handful of people now who are actually selling a platinum album; 500,000 or a million albums. Not just a single. So, now the record labels make a million selling single out to be this great thing. Well, let’s go back to the eighties and nineties when people were selling a million albums. That’s a great thing, when a guy was able to step up and able to sell a million albums. But, you know, a lot of us are forgotten about now, man. I think we put out some good music and I hate when I hear a few people say,” Well, you all had your time man.” I don’t agree with that; that we had our time. I think the time has changed on us. I think the labels have you know, they (the fans) ask, “Why did you leave country music?” That’s a question that’s asked of me all the time, “Why did you get out of country music?” Well, I didn’t get out of Country music. You know, I didn’t leave Country Music, country music left me. We’re still singing good old country songs and still recording good old country songs, me and Diffie and John Michael Montgomery and Tracy Lawrence and Aaron Tippin. I could go on and on. We’re still recording great country music. It’s just not getting heard anymore. Everything now sounds the same to me.

TNB: I was going to say it seems like a lot of times outside of the United States, they expect to hear a lot of the artists that you are talking about. They don’t expect to hear what’s we are actually listening to here. They don’t consider it country.

SK: That’s right! Hey look man, when we go to Canada, we have some of the biggest crowds when we go to Canada because people love country music up there. People love country music here but that’s just not the way the record labels have drifted on radio. Like I said for a long time, I blame radio. Radio won’t play us anymore, and you know what man, I’ll apologize to radio right now, because, I finally realized that radio can only play what the record label send ‘em. I have a little old record label and I can guarantee you; I record country music. It takes a lot of money these days to get a hit record and that’s a fact. That’s one thing bad about me, I tell it like it is and there’s a lot of people that don’t like it but there is a lot of people that do like it. I’m not the only one who feels that way and knows what’s going on. It’s just, I’m just kind of an outspoken guy and I tell it like it is, but, the truth is the truth and the truth hurts sometimes. You know what? It’s still the truth. I don’t care how in the hell you say it.

TNB: I think you are right. That is why you have this thing called Americana.

sammy_kershaw_branson_2011SK: I see Country stations that are poppin’ up, but, you know what? They’re going to have to adjust that format just a little bit because; they’re going to end up like the classic rock stations. You are going to hear the same songs every day. But, in classic rock, if you go back to listen to classic rock, there’s tens of thousands of hits of classic rock songs so why should we have to hear the same thing every day?  It’s the same thing with our classic country stations. Why do I hear the same country songs every day when there are tens of thousands of country songs that were smashes?!

TNB: That’s why I like WSM, in a positive vein; they will play some deep cuts now and then. Kind of mix it up.

SK: Yes.

TNB: I wish there were more WSM’s across the country that broke new artists that were out of the mainstream but also played a lot of classic cuts. So they would say “Oh, I remember that song.” It’s like hasn’t been played like you said.

SK: Uh – huh

TNB: Let talk about A Sammy Claus Christmas; about picking the songs, I mean you already did the one Christmas album. Did you pick songs that brought childhood memories or something?

courtesy - Sammy Kershaw Entertainment

courtesy – Sammy Kershaw Entertainment

SK: It was just something I wanted to do. I wanted it to sound more like something like a children’s Christmas album that they could sing along with. I know that I hear a lot of Christmas classics that there is so much stuff added into them, you know, I know everybody wants to be different; put their own mark on a Christmas song, but, sometimes you know you want to hear the simple way it was done a hundred years ago. I wanted kids to be able to experience what a real Christmas is. You know it’s changed a lot from when I was a boy. Also, when the older people, like myself, and a little bit younger and a little bit older, when they listen to it, I wanted it to be able to take them back when they were little kids to their memories when they were children. We spent a whole month trying to guess what was wrapped underneath the tree. Nowadays, it’s mostly gift cards and money. There’s no thought in that…and I’m guilty of it too. I give all my children money for Christmas, but, I understand they have families now and they could use money more than anything else. Especially in these times, the way they are now in this economy. But, I would love to see Christmas come back. One of my biggest dreams in life is to be the real Santa Claus. I know it sounds stupid and people say it’s crazy but tell me what the hell you want. I really don’t give a shit.  I don’t man. I would love to be the real Santa Claus so kids could feel what Christmas really is. And of course you got to keep Christ in Christmas, that’s it for me man. Like I said, I don’t give a shit what they think. They can say “Oh he’s crazy. He wants to be Santa Claus, what an idiot.” Well, you can call me what the hell you want, you think I give a shit? Not me. I’m happy man. I’m happy thinkin’ that I’d love to be Santa Claus. At least I have some dreams, some people don’t.  That’s’ a hell of a life.

TNB: Well, I think A Sammy Klaus Christmas was a great title. I’ll tell you the cut I really love was “That Spirit of Christmas” it reminded me almost of a Muscle Shoals – Dan Penn kind of thing. I loved it.

SK: Thank you man.

TNB: Were you thinking a little bit like that when you were doing the arrangement or anything?

SK: No, I remember Ray Charles’ arrangement. It has a choir and everything else on it but I didn’t want it to be that complicated. I wanted it to be more of a stripped down version of that song and I didn’t want the harmonies exactly where they had ‘em. I didn’t want that big choir sound in it. So, I went through line by line when I had the background vocals to sing. I went line by line and sought out where I wanted to put a background vocal.

TNB: I was ready to see the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, like, David Hood on that cut, I was like, wow! This is cool. Obviously, everybody is talking about “Santa Claus is Back In Town.” You got that little Elvis and a little Delbert McClinton, tell me what you were thinking on that.

SK: Well, I’m a South Louisiana Boy, you know, we have all kinds of music there, you know, we have good country music and good southern rock and we have zydeco music, French music, swamp pop music we call it.  We got jazz, we got blues, and that’s kind of my deal anyway, all those different kinds of music, that’s how I came up with my sound to start with. Just has soulful stuff.

TNB: I’d almost say when I hear some of those cuts like you do. I think of that soul country back when Delbert McClinton was kind of that.  The Tanya Tucker thing you know. I could see that.

SK: Well, even George Jones is the King of Country Soul man. You know, and I will tell you Ronnie Van Zant, the late Ronnie Van Zant. He sang for Lynyrd Skynyrd, you know, and look man, to me he was a country soul singer in a rock and roll band.

TNB: You can start to talk about Eddie Hinton, Donnie Fritz, and some of those cats.

SK: Yeah man, I just like to feel what he’s feeling when he’s singing. I want to feel his art and his soul or her heart, her soul, you know. I want to feel that.

TNB: Are you going to do any of the Christmas songs live?

SK: I would think so. Yeah, I think I may do one this weekend. I don’t care what Joe or Aaron do, I may do one.

TNB: What one would you want to do?

SK: I’m going to talk to my band when we get on the road here and try to figure that one out, see what we can pull off acoustically.

TNB: As far as the album goes, you’ve got the distribution though Sony/RED. I guess you got it out there on Amazon and stuff.

SK: Yeah, Amazon and I Tunes, you can get it at WalMart.com. I mean of course, everything is out there on the internet now. There are not very many record stores still in business anymore.

TNB: I know around here, there is Grimey’s.

SK: But, you can get hard copies from, like I said, Amazon and Walmart.com or you can just download it from I Tunes.

TNB: Before we go, what’s your kind of memories of Christmas, you talk about what Christmas used to be. Are there any specific memories you want to share?

SK: Yeah, like I said Christmas, I remember when we used to have to guess for two or three weeks what was wrapped under that tree. Of course, we would get out of school for two weeks at Christmas time. You had Christmas and of course, New Years follows. We had a whole week for thanksgiving the month before. And when Christmas rolled around we had two weeks to hang out with our friends and all that stuff and, you know, our Christmas’s in Louisiana weren’t like a lot of the rest of the country. I remember that they were foggy and pretty long and muggy. You know we would go outside and play and have a lot of fun, like, all night long.  We would, all the kids in the neighborhood would get together. We wouldn’t go in the house until it was 10:30. We would hang around outside. We wouldn’t get into trouble. We did a few things, you know, we had fun. I’ll put it that way, we just had fun. We didn’t hurt nobody.  But, nowadays, I don’t see kids play outside anymore. It’s a sad thing man…sad.

TNB: Did you have a musical family? Did you hang out and play music?

SK: No, I’m the only one that ended up doing music in my family. I don’t know why or how it happened that way, but, I’m the only one who ended up doing music.

TNB: What kind of food, Louisiana food, any difference down there during the holidays?

santa_cajunSK: A lot of gumbo’s of course. And of course we do Fried Turkeys. We invented fried turkey down there in Cajun country you know. And of course a lot of rice dressing and candied yams, all that kind of stuff. But, it was Cajun. A lot of flavor and spice, not necessarily hot, there’s a difference between hot and spice. Spicy is a lot of flavor. Hot is just burn your mouth.

TNB: Well, Happy Holidays, anything else you want to talk about real quick?

SK: I think we’re done.

TNB: Good luck with the rest of the year. You have dates going into the middle of summer. Good luck!

SK: You need to keep on rockin’!

– Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridge@hotmail.com