Archives for posts with tag: Third Man Records

Celebrating Nashville Vinyl store finds and stating digital pundits are all wrong!

courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

If you haven’t noticed, collecting vinyl records is becoming a huge thing among all age groups in Nashville. United Record Pressing has become so backlogged that they are expanding into another space. Record Store Day is like a city wide holiday with bands playing all day long at Grimey’s, The Groove and Fond Object.

*many hyperlinks go back to vinyl videos*

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

I caught the bug a few years ago after getting an original copy of Jerry Lee LewisBreathless” on 7 inch Sun Records while going through Bee Branch Arkansas on the way back from Branson, Missouri that I found at a vintage and junk shop.

I didn’t even have anything to play it on, since I have not owned a turntable since 1988. I even sold off my collection which was really large and deep and full of imports in the late eighties for practically nothing. I know I wasn’t the only one to do that.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

It wasn’t until I started buying some vinyl over at Third Man Records that I finally bought a turntable and the venerable receiver and speakers to go with it. It all started on Craigslist where I went through two old well-heeled Marantz and Sony Receivers that burned out after about a year each. The JBL near field monitors and home theater Subwoofers that I located have stood the test of time. I went through one Sony turntable where the line level pre amp fried before going back to Amazon and settling on a reasonably priced yet better sounding Audio Technica turntable. The Sherwood receiver I purchased through Amazon has specs right out of 1990 with 100 watts per side and has a great protection circuit that has stood up for two years.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Ever since that has been resolved, I have been able to concentrate on collecting. Most Collectors are going for the twelve inch 33’s and prices are increasing. I do have a paltry 100 or so “long-play” twelve inch records but I really wanted to hear the sound of the seven inch [45’s] records like I remember.

Post Sex Pistols, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Post Sex Pistols, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Post Sex Pistols, Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Post Sex Pistols, Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Just like 16 bit CD’s and 24 bit hi-def, analog has some rules to tone and bigger mid-range. Twelve inch 45’s are a whole other thing entirely that became popular in the eighties but I’m not going there. Let’s just talk about seven inch records. Although 12 inch 45’s are best known as dance remixes from the 80’s, my first experience was a French Sex Pistols release of “Anarchy In The UK” on that format in 1978 at a Punk Rock shop in Santa Cruz, California.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Seven inch records could be made with more bass and increased output without worrying about the needle skipping on the record. The 45 mix often will be a lot different than the album mix. The flip side or “B” side may be a song that is not available on a record. The mix may be different in other countries. I remember owning a French Polydor copy of Jimi HendrixVoodoo Chile” where the mix had been cranked up and the guitar sounded like you were standing with your ear up against the grill cloth. I used to play it for friends back in the eighties and watch their jaw drop.

The Beatles used to release songs either on albums or on seven inch singles. Eventually the singles showed up as a collection like the Hey Jude album or the double gatefold red and blue albums.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

In my own collection, there was a huge difference between the album cut of The Rolling Stones’ “Get Off Of My Cloud” where Brian Jones’ snaking lead notes were pronounced and the single where Keith Richards’ crunchy rhythm guitar is cranked up and really drives the song playing off of Charlie Watts’ snare. It made the difference between good and great.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

The Sweet talked about how when they found out that “Fox On The Run” was being released as a single, the members of the band went in and completely remixed the song with a much harder edge akin to Motley Crue than the album version. Sweet did this behind Management and Producers backs. They knew what it should sound like and took things into their own hands. They got everybody upset and mad even though the record did well. I’m glad that Sweet did that.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Another good thing about singles is that it was formatted for AM radio where three minutes was the goal and there were limitations to time versus physical size. While some edits were a little annoying some were appreciated if you just wanted to groove and not go into a “space-out mode” like the deleted bridge in the single version of “Whole Lotta Love” by Led Zeppelin. Not to mention, if you haven’t heard Led Zeppelin on seven inch like original cuts “Living Loving Maid” or “Black Dog” than you are in for an experience full of Bonham’s snare cracks and home stereo speakers that will turn into a Jimmy Page Marshall half-stack.

As far as actual tone, I read all the garbage between vinyl and analog buffs and digital hi-def die-hards and it really comes down to whether you like a lot of high frequency stuff that only dogs can hear in a world where a computer doesn’t recognize playing on top of the note or stretch tuning and changes the actual information as well as removing all the bits of sound that define a mid frequency instruments’ personality versus a couple of snaps or crackles and something that sounds very dynamic, alive and in your living room.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

You can take the test for yourself. I own a copy of Bob Marley: Legends on CD and a new old stock copy of “Is This Love” by Bob Marley & The Wailers. I did a side-by-side. The most important aspect is Bob Marley’s voice. If you only heard it on CD, you would never recognize the grit and air that make up his actual voice texture. They are gone in the digital realm. While digital is supposed to be more accurate, it actually sounds like a comical cheap imitation.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Another side by side would be Parliament’s “Tear The Roof Off The Sucker (Give Up The Funk) regarding the groove aspect. Not only does the vinyl single sound thicker and richer in the mids but the sharp edged funk of a tight group gets lost in the digital conversion as the numeric digital world has different numeric values for different frequencies and the groove of all the instruments locking together becomes nothing more than a cool drum pattern with a bunch of instruments that seem to clog undeniably slightly loose at every juncture. The true groove is gone in the digital realm.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

One more major complaint is what digital did to Duane Allman. I own digital versions of “Layla” and Duane’s slide sounds sharp and out of tune thanks to digital algorithms. If you listen to the vinyl album or single you’ll notice Duane is playing on top of the note [not out of tune] and it gives a lift to the mood at that point in the song. It is absolutely beautiful. Too bad Duane didn’t know that computers were going to make his slide out of tune and unlistenable.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Okay, enough of my own observations that seem to defy the logic of quantized digital junkies. If it is all about sounding “real”, “in your living space” and with a wide sound field then that needle dragging through a frequency groove like a work of art is the way to go. If you like snappy eighties style keyboard loops and auto tuned vocals then the current state of shared files should work for you just fine.

My Mother's favorite before she passed away in 1966, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

My Mother’s favorite before she passed away in 1966, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

When I started collecting, one of my friends here in town thought I was going to just go back and buy everything I used to own. I did go after some of that but there were a lot of things I missed growing up and there are songs that did well regionally here in Nashville and are readily available as opposed to many songs that I was into growing up in California.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

For the most part, I grew up in Fresno, California from the last half of 2nd grade through my junior year in high school. That time spent in Fresno meant that my tastes are eclectic, all over the place and really just defined by musicianship, groove or originality.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

If I had to define Fresno during the seventies by five groups, it would probably be Tower Of Power, Supertramp, The Tubes, Sly & The Family Stone and Buck Owens. My personal taste goes way beyond that, but those would be five groups that anybody who grew up there would say, “Oh yeah, for sure they were big in Fresno.” I can name a song by every one of those bands that I liked as well as anybody from Hoover High School Class of 78 could as well.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

You could add any horn band like Chicago, Malo or Blood Sweat & Tears. The biggest cover band was called March Hare [scan of Fresno City College school newspaper circa 1978, see page 4 , article on group called Windfall for more on March Hare members]. They had a full horn section and could play just about anything popular at the time and got paid the most money. They had a four piece, guitar, bass, drums and keyboards group called Spare Hare for a fraction of the full band cost.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

My own personal taste ran the gamut of Hard Rock, Heavy Metal, Funk, Jazz, Punk and so on. I even liked some Country although it really was my parents’ music at the time. To give you an idea, I listened to Judas Priest, The Ramones and liked Power Pop like Raspberries and Pezband but my dream gig would have been to play guitar for Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers in 1977.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

If I tried to collect everything from my past, I would be in deep for years and years.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

There are particular records that I look for such as the three dominant records I remember from my earliest days in San Jose before my parents died in San Jose, California. I have purchased the trio. The Rolling Stones “Get Off Of My Cloud” was the first record I purchased at age 6, by myself, after my mother said I could pick something out. It is still one of my favorites. The other two were San Jose regional records that went onto the national charts, The Syndicate Of SoundLittle Girl” and Count FivePsychotic Reaction.” I did get to watch Count Five practice two blocks away from my Orchard View childhood home back when.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Just about any War single reminds me of Fresno, especially “Me And Baby Brother” which is in my 400 plus and building singles collection.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

In the mid-seventies, I was really into what was modern metal or Hard Rock at the time and singles like UFO, “ Too Hot To Handle” found in Louisville, Kentucky as well as Sweet flipside “Burn On The Flame” remind me of my early band years playing guitar.

As far as collecting goes in Nashville, the biggest amount and the most variety of seven inch records would go to The Great Escape on Charlotte Pike. Pricing is really reasonable. There are loads of $1.00 singles as well as collectables that for the most part are not over $10-a-piece. They put out their new inventory every Thursday and it is kept in bins by date if not in any kind of alphabetical order.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Record Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Record Collection

The Great Escape in Madison may not have as big a selection but will usually have different records then the ones found at the West Nashville store. The best thing to do, regarding The Great Escape, is to sign up for their email list and get notification when records will be off 20% or when they have their sidewalk 25 cent sale including the Bowling Green, Kentucky location.

I usually go for the 25 cent sales including Bowling Green, Kentucky and start digging around. It is important to go with no preconceived notions. It also helps to have some in-depth knowledge of decades of music. They used to have 10 cent sales but I don’t think that will be around again.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Examples of things I have found at 25 cent sales include a radio copy of Pat MethenyNew Chautauqua” which I never knew was released as a single until I found a brand new old stock copy at The Great Escape in Madison. I also found a brand new old stock seven inch copy of “Taboo” by Arthur Lyman. I remember “Taboo” from my Dad’s twelve inch long play records. He had installed a built in system in the living room and this was Hi-Fidelity recording. It was meant to show off frequency response and clarity but it would now be categorized as Lounge Music. It would fit in with a Martin Denny collection. I don’t think any of these records sold well in this format but it is so cool to have them on seven inch.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

In Nashville, there are a lot of radio copies around that ended up in retired DJ collections as the format declined and now they are all over town. A rule of thumb on seven inch radio copies is that in the 50’s and 60’s they actually spun the record numerous times and there can be a lot of wear on a very popular record and little wear on a record that did not take off.

In the 70’s and 80’s, AM radio used a tape cartridge similar to 8 track tape and would record the cut to be played multiple times on tape till it wore out and then would re-record on a new “Cart”. It is possible to find near mint radio copies from the 70’s and 80’s. I have found a few. My gem is a radio copy from the late 60’s of Big Brother & The Holding CompanyPiece Of My Heart” where Janis Joplin’s live performance rings clear and gives a front row seat of her performance. It gives me the chills. I paid less than $10 almost two years ago at The Great Escape.

Apple Records from Portugal, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collecton

Apple Records from Portugal, Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collecton

Although it is easy to find several Excello record titles in Nashville, I have yet to find any of the three Marion James “Nashville’s Queen of The Blues” singles that were released here locally after years of searching. I guess I will have to resort to Ebay.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

There is no problem finding all the Country you want, especially mint new old stock copies of deep catalog Artists. I don’t know enough about that to make an educated guess. I do have Patsy ClineI Fall To Pieces”, plenty of Buck Owens and some Kris Kristofferson. Kristofferson singles are plentiful even on the smaller labels as he was really popular in Nashville as a songwriter. A good place for deep catalog new old stock Country would be Lawrence Record Shop down on Lower Broadway although I did find a Wreckless Eric single on Stiff Records as well as the previously mentioned Bob Marley copy of “Is This Love” at Lawrence Record Shop.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Collection

With current interest in Muscle Shoals, Fame Records can be found easily and I definitely look for Candi Staton and other Jimmy Hall produced gems. The Great Escape on Charlotte Pike usually has plenty of Fame Records along with all things Beatles and Elvis.

Since Nashville was a big hub for actual Music “Business”, there was manufacturing, distribution, recording, management and publicity that all had copies of material. There were warehouses and backrooms of vinyl that never got sold that now has found its way into used vinyl stores all over town. It’s not all Country either.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

While Grimey’s would be ranked number one for new vinyl in town, as far as used seven inch records, it’s best to go the to the Grimey’s Too [Preloved Store] and go through the two boxes on the front desk. That would be the most recent purchases. I recently found a radio copy of Blind MelonTones of Home” by doing just that. I was surprised to even see a vinyl radio copy release from 1992. I found a vintage radio copy of Judas Priest’ “Living After Midnight” as well for $1.00.

Grimey’s does stock the largest selection of local label seven inch releases. It is possible to buy a new record from GED Soul along with Infinity Cat and Third Man Records all in the same trip.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

The Groove is great for new vinyl but also has a decent stock of used seven inch vinyl. Because of its East Nashville neighborhood location, they have quite a few used copies of Alternative and Punk bands from the 90’s to the present day. If that is a specific thing, this would be a great place to check out. For me, I’m primarily looking for 60’s and 70’s but there usually is an 80’s record worth getting every time I stop by. This was the only place in town that I saw a single by The Jam. It was an import. I am looking for stateside releases since they are even harder to find.

Fond Object is an interesting place. This started from the owners’ own private collection, I believe, he was based out of Austin so, this store has a lot of late 80’s and 90’s Punk. Fond Object had stuff that probably was never available in Nashville in a retail used vinyl store. They actually had a copy of The Sex PistolsPretty Vacant” American release on Warner Brothers but they wanted $20 for it, so I passed hoping to get at a place where it would mean nothing like Lawrence Record Shop.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Third Man Records has just about every Third Man seven inch release in stock at any given time at their company store. My favorite non-Jack White single, Dan SartainBohemian Grove” was easy to find. Dan Sartain with Matt Patton [Model Citizen, The Dexateens, and The Drive By Truckers] on bass was part of the Birmingham Scene when I lived there. Third Man has been releasing a few Sun Records seven inch re-releases as well. The Raconteurs cut “Old Enough” with Ricky Skaggs still has never been released on vinyl at the home of the world’s fastest record.

Infinity Cat opened up their office to visitors with new vinyl behind United Record Pressing after having numerous fans show up at the door wanting to say “hi” on their visit to Nashville.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

That’s about it for seven inch records, except for, maybe the occasional find in an antique mall. After all, most of these records would be considered antiques.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

It’s always worth checking out the local shop when you’re out on the road. I stopped by Rasputin Records in San Jose when I was out in California recently and found the Record Store Day release of Junior Kimbrough and The Black Keys both doing “Meet Me In The City” [Fat Possum] which was impossible to find here after they were all immediately snatched up. Hill Country Blues is well known in Nashville, but the single had little value in San Jose, California. Apparently, the locals are clueless about Junior and there was a stack of copies available.

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

Courtesy Brad Hardisty Private Collection

It was also easier to get a copy of Simo’s single through Amoeba’s website in California.

  • Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN
Advertisements

Two children left to their own devices shun all the millions spent on lobbing them current cheap artificial commercial culture for thirty to forty year old vinyl artifacts.

henry mancini classicI recently got married and went from a household of one to four. My new bride has two children that are developing their own musical tastes at the age of four and nine.

The nine year old has some highbrow tastes already since his autistic focus has gravitated towards movie soundtracks favoring composer Henry Mancini as well as James Bond Soundtracks.

The four year old daughter was into the current millions spent on films like the Lego Movie and Tegan and Sara’sEverything Is Awesome” as well as her older brother’s favorite, Pharrell William’sHappy” that had both of them bouncing along to YouTube.

When we were dating, the four year old became intrigued with my vinyl collection and started asking me to play stuff, especially 80’s dance music. The nine year old autistic spectrum boy was not at all amused, his comment was, “I hate your music!”

pink pantherMany autistic children have a main focus and his are movies and memorizing all the vital statistics off of the DVD and Blue-Ray clamshells. He can tell you what year the first Pink Panther movie was made. He can tell you all about Esther Williams or Katherine Hepburn much to the shock of people decades older. Henry Mancini is Paul McCartney and John Lennon all rolled into one. He can do no wrong.

jack white another way to dieOne time, I said, “I have something you might like. I have a James Bond theme.” His eyes lit up as I pulled out the Jack WhiteAlicia Keys seven inch, “Another Way To Die” on Third Man Records in gold vinyl. He had to hear it. I gave it a spin on the Audio Technica turntable blasting through a pristine Sherwood receiver and a pair of JBL monitors with twin subs. He was all ears.

After we were married, the two kids took their respective rooms upstairs and started migrating to the living room going through my vinyl collection.

herbie hancock rockitThe four year old picked out her first record at The Groove: Herbie HancockRockit” virgin vinyl on Columbia. Herbie Hancock is still her favorite when her teachers ask about her favorite it ignites a littler laughter and surprise at her Pre-School mainly because it’s not Katy Perry or Taylor Swift.

janet jackson controlHe likes it a lot too. They found the “Rockit – dancing pants” video on YouTube and they watch it almost every morning to wake up during breakfast time. Other times, it’s Janet Jackson or C&C Music Factory. Most often the four year old is practicing her dance moves while her older brother has his arm doing Pete Townshend style “windmills”.

cc music factoryThe nine year old has now gone through all 300 seven inch records and has memorized names, logos, labels, dates, artists and knows the difference between radio copies, promotional copies and limited editions.

frank zappa im the slimeHe has a new favorite artist outside of his beloved Henry Mancini: Frank Zappa. I think that has started some interesting conversations in his 4th grade class when he tells them about “I’m The Slime” on limited edition green vinyl on Barking Pumpkin Records. He sings along and adds all the music parts with his vocal impersonations.

greenhornesSo, here are his current top three favorite artists in order, Frank Zappa, Jack White and The Greenhornes. Third Man Records is one of his main searches as he locates all things Jack White as well as any Columbia Records because he knows Columbia from all of his movie memorization.

deep purpleSpeaking of movies, Warner Brothers, Deep Purple Highway Star” on a limited edition Record Store Day pressing was an instant hit.

Okay, the four year old is becoming very opinionated and 80’s dance music seems to really get her bouncing off the walls especially “Rockit” at number one. C&C Music Factory is a close second.

run dmc its trickyThe four year old is even more opinionated than the nine year old. She really liked Run DMC, “It’s Tricky” so I flipped it to MC Hammer, “You Can’t Touch This” figuring it would be the right transition and she gave Hammer a thumbs down.

I’m sure that as they transition into their teens and start to pay attention to what everybody else is doing they will start to become the by-product of current ad campaigns, but for now we celebrate their discovery and enjoyment.

  • Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridgeathotmaildotcom

The Emily Bell Nashville Interview

photo courtesy Emily Bell

photo courtesy Emily Bell

I’m definitely from a more Soul and Rock & Roll background, you know, and it’s cool getting to meet other people in Nashville and different writers that go against the grain a bit.” – Emily Bell

Austin based singer/songwriter Emily Bell has been spending a few days in Nashville getting ready for her set premiering her latest album In Technicolor  featuring the single “Back The Way That I Was” Thursday night at The Basement with an early 7Pm set. The album shows a varied background since Emily has been involved in music and performance since growing up in Houston and attending Houston’s High School for the Performing and Visual Arts.

emily bell album coverEmily Bell spent some University time in New York City before eventually ending up out on the West Coast working with former members of Tony!Toni!Tone! cutting her teeth on multiple songwriter sessions for a long stretch at Raphael Saadiq’s Burbank Studio before returning to Texas and laying down roots in Austin with Co-writer and life partner, John Evans.

Emily combines “rootsy” soulful vocals reminiscent of Imelda Mae meets K.T. Tunstall and Elizabeth Cook with the visual beauty that ties her to the King of Rock & Roll with Elvis-era Ann Margaret looks and a sultry Lisa Marie Presley gaze.  She is making her Nashville debut this week.

Brad Hardisty / The Nashville Bridge: Have you been off tour for a few days?

Emily Bell: Yeah, well I’ve had a couple of days off.  I have been these past few days in writing sessions in Nashville.

TNB: Really! So you have been in Nashville?

EB: I am in Nashville right now. I am currently parked on the side of the road. I just picked up John Evans [Co-writer, partner] from the airport. He has writing sessions this week. 

TNB: When you talk about writing sessions is it for your own thing or doing something on the side for the publishing company?

EB: This is stuff for my own thing. You know, while I am really busy with the tour and supporting this record, we’re starting the ground work of, you know, writing the new songs for the new record and I came to Nashville last month and met with a bunch of different publishing companies and they really helped me set up good sessions with some of their writers that I would really blend well with. It has been really great so far and I have been really excited to be writing again.

TNB: Is there any writer in particular that you think is somebody you will definitely end up working with yet?

EB: I am really excited to write with Mike Krompass. He was the drummer for Smashmouth and he has this Rock and Roll background. I am excited to get in and write with him.

TNB: You will find all kinds of people here in Nashville. There are so many people moving here it’s crazy.

photo courtesy Emily Bell

photo courtesy Emily Bell

EB: Yeah, I know. I’m definitely from a more Soul and Rock & Roll background, you know, and it’s cool getting to meet other people in Nashville and different writers that go against the grain a bit.

TNB: I noted that you are pretty eclectic and I was looking at John Evan’s stuff and he seems more focused in sort of a Marshall Crenshaw kind of way. How do you guys work together as writers? Do you mainly write and then do arrangements with him?

EB: When John and I first kind of ran into each other we kind of knew each other for a long time and I was very familiar with his music, but, we both just kind of collided and it was really a natural experience; how we write together. It comes up in so many different ways. I’ll come up with lyrics and he’ll come up with melody or I’ll come up with melody and he’ll come up with musical instrumentation. It is really organic the way we work together. His style and my style, they are very different but, we found a way to complement each other and almost create something very different and that was new to us. So, it’s really a great partnership and I’m always surprised and excited when we write together.

TNB: The band you work with, is that The John Evans Band basically?

EB: When we tour we share bands. I have some core musicians and he has some core musicians. When we are on tour we have the same players and it’s nice. We have been sharing the band recently.

TNB: Are you going to stay in Austin, is that your hometown for now?

EB: Yeah, you know Austin is a really great home base for us. We love that city and they have really embraced John and I and it’s also, it’s a great launching pad and getting to travel to Nashville and travel to New York and travel to L.A.; we are happy with that for now. I don’t know what’s going to happen in the future. I, for one, like to move around a lot.

TNB: I noticed you have been between New York, L.A. and Austin and Houston. Have there been other places you have lived in?

EB: Those are the primary places I have lived in. I lived in Oakland for a while. Between moving from L.A. to Austin, I took time off and I just wanted to just really get out and get my brain fresh so I travelled to India and I travelled around Southeast Asia for three months.

TNB: Was India kind of a spiritual thing, like with The Beatles?

EB: I mean it was more, it wasn’t a spiritual quest, it was more of… I didn’t go to Ashrams. I had been to Ashrams and I had visited the Temple. It was a spiritual quest in some way but, it was more of an adventure quest. I wanted to experience another part of the world and that is always spirituality in some form.

TNB: Did you bring any instruments back with you?

EB: No, oh my gosh, but, I wanted to. I had this man teach me how to play the Sitar. I mean, he gave me like an hour lesson. Those instruments are just so gorgeous. I mean they are huge and it is so expensive to bring those instruments back. I really wanted to though.

TNB: What do we expect when you play at The Basement this week? Are you doing an in-store at Grimey’s before? Or, just doing the show?

EB: I’m just doing the show at The Basement. This is kind of like my first time here. You know you first have to kind of break into the Nashville scene.  It’s a slower process, so, we decided to just hit up The Basement and invite as many people out as we can and see what happens from there and hopefully once people get to see us they will want to book us more.

TNB: Even though The Basement is small, if they agreed to have you there that’s good. They are kind of picky so that is a good choice.

EB: I was really excited to do the show there. When they hopped on board I was really excited.

TNB: Are you familiar with the Soul scene here in Nashville?

EB: No, I’m not familiar with it. I’m not familiar with Nashville in general. I’m still new to this town. It’s exciting and I’m kind of learning something new about it every day.

TNB: You ought to check out G.E.D Soul Records. There are a lot of retro-soul acts and they are all out of here, former students of Belmont University and stuff like that. There may be some acts you might want to book with next time.

EB: That’s good information. We will look them up.

TNB: They specialize in vinyl. If you go to Grimey’s and ask about G.E.D. Soul Records, they will have a whole section.

EB: Very cool. I love that. Last time I was here I had to go to Third Man Records. I love what Jack White is doing with the 45’s, it’s so cool. So that was really cool for me.

TNB: Did you record a song in the recording booth that presses records?

EB: We wanted to, but, it was out of order that day. That was one of the biggest reasons for me going.

TNB: Guess who was the second person to use that booth?

EB: Who?

TNB: Neil Young.

EB: Oh God, wow, that’s amazing.

TNB: Who do you guys gig with in Austin when you are back home?

EB: Well, I do shows with so many different musicians in Austin. I have done shows with Hayes Carll, Rosie Flores…

TNB: Oh cool, I like Rosie.

photo courtesy Emily Bell

photo courtesy Emily Bell

EB: There is a long list of Austin musicians that I am still dying to play with. A lot of local Indie bands. I started out playing with The Happen-Ins. There is a band called The Couch. The first summer that I was there I was invited to start my own little music festival called Summer Camp that benefitted local non-profit organizations. It was my way to friend other musicians in the town. I was still so new and I thought why don’t I just…it was a whole long day event that happened every Sunday over the summer and we had an above ground pool and I had vamp counselors and we had this whole kind of Dazed and Confused summer camp scene and I booked about four bands every day and I just closed the night out and there were so many great bands that were on that.

EB: That was a great project. Now, this is the first album that you and John Evans put together, right?

TNB: Yeah.

TNB: I would say that it is really eclectic, kind of a blend going in different directions. The single reminded me of Bow Wow Wow, kind of Punk Rockabilly. Where do you see your stuff going? You are doing these writing sessions, is there a certain direction that you are going to start aiming for on the next record? Or, are you going to just kind of keep it where you want to go?

EB: There is a definite direction I want to take with this new record. I’m a Rock & Roll girl at heart and I really want to bring that out in this next record. Without giving too much away, I definitely want something that is just rockin’ and kind of show that a female fronted rock band isn’t bad!

TNB: Do you think it is still going to be more “Roots Rock”?

EB: Yeah, I mean when I say Rock & Roll I mean “Roots Rock’. I think of the Rockabilly Artists and I also think of Led Zeppelin. I think of Tom Petty; just all the greats that have inspired me and have inspired the music that I write.   

TNB: I would say you are in a great place. I remember when I was in Texas I would just turn onto the Texas Chart channels just because it’s different than what you listen to anywhere else. It has a lot of Artists that are big in Texas like Joe Ely. You have some great flavor and you are working with a great partner, John Evans.

photo courtesy Emily Bell

photo courtesy Emily Bell

EB: Thank you so much. John and I are very excited to write this next record.

– Brad Hardisty – Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridgeathotmaildotcom

infinity cat headquarters performerFollowing on the several year stint and recent upgrades to Third Man Records Company Store and the recently opened Fond Object in Riverside by The Ettes, Infinity Cat realized that so many fans were making pilgrimages from all over the world and knocking on the door looking for hard-to-find label merch that it was time to just open the door and say “welcome.”

infinity cat welcome 01Infinity Cat Records made the following announcement:We have opened the Infinity Cat Visitors Center at Infinity Cat headquarters. Why? Because you asked us to. We receive so many requests (“Hi, we live in London and coming to Nashville. We own pretty much everything Infinity Cat. Can we come visit?”). Wanna come say hi? Call 615-730-8417 and we’ll let you know if we are there. The rest of these words come from Steve Haruch’s great article. “There will be records for sale, of course, and ICR logo coffee mugs, but “the best part,” Orrall says, “is that 80 percent of it will only be in the store” and not available through the label’s website. That stuff includes out-of-print items like the last original MEEMAW T-shirt, for instance, and band tour posters, some of them from other countries — that sort of thing.

inf cat 10 2nd heavycream 07 wThe not-a-shop is a response to requests from fans who have wanted to stop by when they’re in Nashville. Now they’ll have something to visit aside from a small office and a kitchen. And while there won’t be regular business hours, there will be impromptu times of openness, which will be announced via the label’s various social media accounts. Instagram followers will get to see new items (including vintage records, radios and magazines) as they are added to the shop visitors’ center.

inf cat 10 diarrhea planet sandwichesThank you Steve Haruch for a great description and great photos. What will be the first thing you want to buy? “Loose Jewels” by Diarrhea Planet. Why? Well, let’s let MTV do the talking now: “”Take away the branding, the deal-making, the app-launching, the corporate sponsorships, the giant Doritos stage, Train playing the Rachel Ray day party, the free piggyback rides, the weird giveaways, the free beer, the expensive cabs, the long lines and the Justin Timberlake, and really what you have left is a little ol’ dusty festival with a band named Diarrhea Planet on the schedule. Decades from now, when those of us who attended SXSW 2013 are on our deathbeds, we’ll whisper but two words to our loved ones, and those words will be “Diarrhea Planet.” They won’t understand, but we will.” – MTV Hive

inf cat 10 yes sandwichSo come on buy, pick up something special, and say hi to the official Infinity Cat, D. Boone. See you soon!

inf cat 10 skyblazer 01

Visitors center photo from Infinity Cat press release. All other photos, Brad Hardisty taken at Infinity Cat 10th Anniversary shows of Heavy Cream, Skyblazer, Infinity Cat Sandwich and Diarrhea Planet and Infinity Cat front door taken for Performer Magazine .

record store day 2013 021Record Store Day started well before Saturday with lines cueing up at 6PM the day before at Third Man Records with some vinyl collectors showing up from several states away for the special Record Store Day items.

record store day 2013 035Third Man had a private party with tour buses lined up which included Willie Nelson and Neil Young last Thursday night in preparation for Jack White’s latest installation into the company store: a vocal booth where you can cut your own 7 inch record and have it come out of a machine ready to play.

record store day 2013 026record store day 2013 031record store day 2013 030The line started to form at Grimeys about the same time. The people at the front of the line had started about 6PM Friday as well to make sure they had their pick of the special releases. The front of liners at Grimeys had a laundry list of stuff to grab and Dave Matthews rare 500 only vinyl was on the list.

record store day 2013 024The first campers at The Great Escape Charlotte store arrived at 8PM. The main reason they got there was for the same rare Dave Matthews’ 500 only release. Great Escape was said to have two copies.  The best kept secret in town is that Great Escape gets a majority of the same things that Grimeys gets but, if you arrive about 5AM you can probably get what you want and be 4th or 5th in line. The Great Escape also is the earliest store to open at 8AM.

Grimeys definitely had top flight entertainment all day long with headliners Paramore playing later in the day.

record store day 2013 051The Groove was not to be outdone with a Mas Tacos truck out front serving up some of East Nashville’s best Mexican food and a stage in the back. The Groove probably had a well-balanced full plate with a pair of local labels G.E.D. Soul Records and Jeffery Drag Records  that featured Natural Child rolling papers made in the Peoples Republic of China manning booths with plenty of new vinyl.

record store day 2013 082 smallG.E.D. Soul had a Record Store Day 7” release, Sky Hi’s Reality Check as well as an afternoon performance by recording artist DeRobert & The Half-Truths who performed with the sun hitting the band straight in the face. DeRobert blocked the glare with some cool shades.

record store day 2013 063G.E.D. Soul Records was spinning vinyl in between sets.

record store day 2013 078 smallrecord store day 2013 061 smallGraffiti artists Mike “Ol Skool” Mucker and Troy Duff  had their own thing going on in the alley behind The Groove.

record store day 2013 047The afternoon behind The Groove got hot when KCRW “Breakout Band” Penicillin Baby started off with some great Garage surf staring at their guitars and meditating on the Fender reverb spring action.

record store day 2013 053 smallrecord store day 2013 057 smallTristen  was in good spirits going through a strong enthusiastic set.

record store day 2013 069record store day 2013 072record store day 2013 068 smallChrome Pony had it all, a great drummer playing extremely tough and tight on the kit and a red headed guitarist that matched the bright sun glowing in the afternoon sky. For once, Nashville had a perfect weather day this year.

record store day 2013 049The Groove also had bins outside lined up on the side of the old house with one dollar records. It was a sure hit with what dollars were left over after buying the Big Star $39.99 double vinyl.

record store day 2013 075 smallEast Nashville parents brought their kids along and it was interesting to see Nashville veteran alt-rockers Forget Cassettes kind of Goth pop – Souxsie & The Banshees type thing going through a six year old’s brain. A little more mind expanding than afternoon geography at the elementary school.

record store day 2013 042Even Ernest Tubb Record Shop got into the Record Store Day thing with a few featured releases including Eric Church’s vinyl that had Whiskey poured into the actual pressing and the Chet Atkin’s Blackjack EP that was quickly sold out and was never seen by anybody but the buyers.

record store day 2013 074Phonoluxe, which doesn’t purchase any new records, but, may have the best variety of used vinyl in town, pulled out all the stops and brought many hidden treasures out for purchase. This was the stuff that might only get to EBay. They had plenty of rare stuff for the serious collector.

record store day 2013 041record store day 2013 038record store day 2013 039Rock band, The Ettes opened up a new used vinyl store and label in Riverside called Fond Object on Record Store Day. Fond Object fills a niche of more punk and metal with stock that used to part of one of the band members own collection starting out a busy room full of noise.

record store day 2013 087 smallrecord store day 2013 089 smallAn afternoon of fine music on the green was to be had behind Fond Object featuring the true country honky tonk of Alabama native J.P. Harris & The Tough Choices which featured a little Speedy West / Jimmy Bryant kind of dual lead vibe before the end of their set.

record store day 2013 106 smallThe sun started to settle and all the vinyl was packed away in the when Cheap Time featuring Jessica from Heavy Cream on bass went through a ripping set behind Fond Object. Speaking of Heavy Cream, the missing record for Record Store Day that should have been was a back to back release of The Stooges, “1969” and Heavy Cream’s “1979.” Elektra and Infinity Cat, are you listening? It was interesting to hear three chord slash with a couple of three year old kids chasing each other in front of the band.

record store day 2013 096Fond Object’s Record Store Day party featured mixed drinks and custom hot dogs. The best had homemade tomatillo Sauce with sour cream and cilantro. I need to make that one at home.

record store day 2013 113I was looking forward to going through my new finds, but, my earlt 90’s Marantz 780 receiver had a fit and shut down and is now in search of a good stereo repair guy before I get to enjoy my cache of new colored vinyl.

record store day 2013 108 bwAll photo © 2013 Brad Hardisty

–          Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridge@hotmail.com

Record Store Day 2013 056Record Store Day Returns this Saturday April 20th and for Nashville that means long lines at Grimey’s, The Great Escape, Third Man Records and The Groove for special limited edition vinyl released in just about any vinyl format.

Record Store Day 2013 033Record Store Day was started by a couple of record store clerks just a few years ago to celebrate the format and give the last independent record stores something exciting to drive in music lovers to buy and enjoy music.

It was like the line drawn in the sand. It was the last final stand for vinyl. They knew they were right. That first year drew people to independent record stores.

Record Store Day 2013 036I bought a simple Sony turntable for $89 at the last chain record store FYE that was housed in the once beloved Tower Records Nashville before it closed and got tore down to enjoy some new 7 inch vinyl and a couple of long play 12 inch records I bought out of the back.

 

Can't Turn You Loose Side B recorded Live

Can’t Turn You Loose Side B recorded Live

I had a feeling it was going to be good. When I dropped the needle in the groove and the turntable was hooked into my recent generation Sony 6.1 100 Watt per channel receiver I expected to get that natural sound wave vibe back in my face. I kind of did. It wasn’t as great as I thought it was going to be. I chalked it up to a cheaper turntable; after all, I had a newer state of the art consumer Sony receiver and a pair of good ears.

Record Store Day 2013 034I started buying a lot of 7 inch singles new and old in anticipation of an eventual late 50’s Seeburg Jukebox purchase for the house. I figured they would sound better with the old tube circuits and the fat second order mids that digital cannot handle.

Well, last year the Sony receiver that I had got such a good deal on from Craigslist gave up the ghost and I was without raging CD and DVD quality going through my JBL studio monitors and unmatched Zenith subwoofer.

Record Store Day 2013 035I went back to Craigslist and found an old school first generation home theater Marantz SR780 from the early 90’s. This was a beast with heavy transformers. The Marantz cost $4500 back in the day and I picked it up for $75 after taking it for a test drive in the guys East Nashville living room. It didn’t come with a remote and there was barely a legible read out of whether it was a CD, Tape or wow… the new format, DVD! It was 100 Watts per channel as well and even though it was rated the same as the Sony my DVD Movies were sounding huge.

Record Store Day 2013 037I hooked up the entry level Sony turntable and threw on a 7 inch original Stax release of “ Time Is Tight” by Booker T. & The MG’s. The beef was back! It wasn’t the cheap turntable. It was the new Sony receiver that had newer generation lightweight digital transformers and was EQ’d for the weakling in the room: digital!!!

Now, it sounded like the four piece combo was in my living room. Steve Cropper’s Fender Twin was right at my feet. It was soothing. It was peaceful. It was medicine for the soul. It was the truth. A needle travelling through a sound wave is the most natural representation of what was recorded. If you want more truth, get bigger grooves.

Record Store Day 2013 039Neil Young said it best when he noticed something was missing from digital and he said,” It is like looking through a screen door. You can see what is going on, but something is missing and blocking everything from coming through.”

Record Store Day 2013 040Digital is incapable of completely reproducing the complexity of sound between 50 and 7k. It’s just not there. Music equipment and speakers are being designed to mimic what Digital is good at which is everything below 40k and stuff above 16k. It is stuff that our ears were not really designed for  and it is why we get listeners fatigue and become edgy after listening to CD’s and even worse…MP3’s.

Record Store Day 2013 045As far as Sirius radio, all out music deconstruction is going on. Every song sounds like Heart’s “Barracuda” ran through a cheap flanger stomp box into a Maestro Phase Shifter giving the effect of a cheap car stereo speaker being shaken not stirred in a half full Slurpee cup, round and round she goes what frequencies you get nobody knows!

Record Store Day 2013 046Another thing is going on. Digital music is a numeric algorithm going on to reproduce the sound. The algorithm itself is wearing us down. I think that is the real reason most people do not put the value in purchasing music that they once do. It is not soothing to the soul. The human brain is much more complex a machine than a computer and our brain is sensing the algorithm process going on constantly and micro nano seconds of each frequency are not locking together because of the math processing needed for each band in the frequency pool. The music is not locked together. The groove is gone. It may be only by microtonal variations, but, our mind and body sense it and eventually gives up on reaching harmonic harmony.

Record Store Day 2013 054Go buy some old vinyl where the band was recorded virtually live in the studio. Look for some vintage Booker T. & The MG’s or The Ventures records. The band is locked together solid. The groove is locked together. Get a 7 inch original of Parliament, “Tear The Roof Off The Sucker.”

Record Store Day 2013 043I played the old Parliament vinyl on Casablanca for a record company head that works with Funk, Soul and Jazz. He stood there for a while in amazement. He hadn’t heard a vinyl version of this stuff in a while. The brain can tell the difference. After all these years and HD Pro Tools, digital cannot lock the groove together. Even with a good engineer or producer sliding tracks around in Pro Tools or any other digital recording model, the groove is not there, it can’t. Groove is a community of musicians’ thing.

Record Store Day 2013 055One musician is playing slightly forward while the other is playing deep in the pocket. It is a group of musicians finding their space in the composition. A digital format cannot mimic that. It is too complex. They can design an algorithm called natural groove and create a numeric value for that, but, it is impossible.

Record Store Day 2013 057When Roland decided they had finally come up with a digital algorithm good enough that it could mimic the classic Electric Rhoads Piano they invited Ray Charles for a private test drive at West L.A. Music where I worked back in the day. He sat down and played for a minute and said, “It sounds pretty good, but, does it have stretch tuning?”

Record Store Day 2013 048Roland quickly packed it up and went back to the drawing boards and at least came out with a stretch tuning patch. It sucked. Digital cannot compensate for what a skilled music creator and a tuned set of ears can produce.

Record Store Day 2013 041Anyway, Record Store Day is upon us. There is a great list of stuff coming out. An employee at United Record Pressing said that they had not been this busy since they opened the doors in 1947 getting stuff pressed for Record Store Day 2013. Vinyl is on the rise. CD’s are on the decline and MP3’s are a rip off!

Record Store Day 2013 038Do yourself a favor. Be there! You better get there real early. If you haven’t bought a turntable, buy one after you get yourself a handful of vinyl. There are a lot of releases that never made it to CD. Do some research and you will find stuff to go out and look for.

Record Store Day 2013 058Also, they were not referred to as 7 inch, 10 inch and 12 inch vinyl unless it was a weird format like a 12 inch 45. They were 33’s, 45’s and 78’s. We referred to it by the speed brotha!

All photo © Brad Hardisty

–          Brad Hardisty, Nashville, TN     thenashvillebridge@hotmail.com